Monday, March 4, 2013

TX Turf Gator Disc Brake service

 I have our Tx gator in for winter service . We like this model very much , it's peppy and brakes are outstanding . 4 wheel disc brakes . They are not cheap to replace so if you want to get your moneys worth out of the pads the slides should be serviced at least once a year twice if possible . While checking the front brakes check for loose parts . ( The bushings where getting bad on our king pin type front end  . ) Also check the wheel bearings for roughness , they should roll pretty freely .

If your servicing the brakes take the clips off the end off the pins and remove the large Allan head bolts . Lay out the parts so they go back on in the same place . After the pins are out you can slide caliper and brake pads out . You can use a piece of mechanics wire to hold caliper up so the line won't get damaged .The pic above is a rear disc brake . 


This is what I used to push the caliper piston in . Hold the bolt steady and turn the nut up . This way it won't gouge the piston . Push it in till it just stops . Don't over do it . They recommend pushing it in with a C-clamp, but on the rear with the park brake I didn't have something large enough to use . 

 Next I removed the slides and cleaned them up on the wire wheel and put never seize on them.
If these are not serviced they may seize or just one seize causing the brakes to wear out faster or on an angle . 
The bolt where cleaned up the same as the slides . I was quite happy to see the never seize from last season still on them .

 
The pad is still ok , about half worn . The wear limit is 3/64 ths . I did order new pads now in case I need them later in the season . 
 
The disc's where just scuffed up with a medium grit emery cloth . 
 
The wear limit for the disc is 3/16 th . If they are really rough you might be able to get them turned down at a brake repair shop . I'll be looking into our rear ones when it comes time to replace the pads . I find the rear gets rough from all the debris picked up on the pads from hauling loads . 
 
Pic of one of the brake pads . If your just cleaning them up I use a medium grit emery cloth on a hard flat surface and keeping even pressure moving it in a figure 8 pattern . Does a pretty good job .


Reassemble using torque specs in the manual . Don't forget about the little cir clips on the end of the pins . I'm assuming it's a safety in case the bolts back off to keep the pads from falling out .  

3 comments:

  1. Hey Bob thanks for the great post. I was wondering if you could give me the size of the Allen bolts. I want to avoid having to buy the whole set of sizes.

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  2. Thanks for commenting . Mine are 3/8 ths .

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  3. Just serviced the brakes and rotors on mine. The last tech that worked at the Country Club put a pad on backwards and wiped out the rotor. During reassembly, I found the pistons very difficult to collapse. They didn't want to sit flush with the bore. After investigating, I found the Parking brake lever to be fully adjusted with tension on the cable. Holding the pistons out. Probably over adjusted due to the poor holding from a lack of a rotor.
    Anyways, backed off the parking brake cable and all was well.
    Just a reminder, if your parking brake isn't holding, look at the friction materials prior to adjustment.

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